John Marvel, Sr.

John Marvell Marvel Sr.-1 was born on 04 Aug 1632 in Melbourne, Cambridgeshire, England. He died on 29 Jul 1707 in Accomack, Virginia, United States. Ann West daughter of Jonathan West and Catherine was born in 1632 in Accomac, Accomack, Virginia. She died in 1710 in Somerset, Worchester County, Maryland.

They had the following children:

1.  John Marvel Jr. was born in 1674 in Accomack, Virginia. He died in 1707.  There are no records that show that John had married.

2. Thomas M. Marvel Sr. was born in 1682 in Somerset, Maryland. . He married Elizabeth Huggins on 16 Jun 1720 in Stepney Parish, Wicomico, Maryland. He died on 28 Mar 1753 in Somerset, Worcester, Maryland.

3. Myrtle Marvel was born in Somerset, Maryland.

 

1st Generation in America

There seems to be a controversy over when John came to America and who sponsored him.  There are two listings for John Marvell.  One has John sponsored by John Browne in 1652 and the other sponsored by Col. Edmund Scarburgh dated 1652 and 1653.

 The entry for John Browne is found in Nugent’s, Cavaliers and Pioneers, page 183 & 267.  John is listed along with several others.  The listing is as follows:

“TIMOTHY COE OF NORTHAMPTON AND ACCOMACK COUNTIES, VA”

The earliest mention of Timothy Coe in Virginia is the record of his transport dated November 27, 1652. He, along with twenty others, are given as headrights of John Browne, who was granted 1000 acres on the Machipongo River in Northampton County for bringing them into the colony. With the headright certificate Browne purchased a plantation bounded on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and on the south by Phillips Creek. Headrights were John Marvell, John Hordwell, Thomas Major, Mary Griffeth, William Alsworth, John Martin, Walter Wood, Thomas Crew, James Hill, Robert Winley, Robert Mapps, William Ebourne, Robert Hearne, Thomas Solbey, Prissell Feelee, Thomas Greene, Daniel Shetworth, Millisent Green, Joseph Ingram and Timothy Coe. Web site copyright 1996-2005 by Barbara Cox. Page updated March 21, 2005 (bc) (Nugent, “Cavaliers and Pioneers”, first volume, p. 183.)

Note: Aug. 12 John Marrell (Marvel) was listed as a head right for Edmund Scarburgh (Jr.) in a patent for land on Occohannock Creek, which is in Accomack County, Virginia, on the bay side of the peninsula called “the Eastern Shore”. This may have been John Marvell; many of the names listed were also listed, along with John Marvell, in a patent to Edmund’s brother Charles Scarburgh

HISTORY NOTE: In the early years, land was distributed through a headright system; that is, a person was entitled to 50 acres of land for each person (headright) whose way he paid into the area to help settle the land, including himself and family members. Appearance of a name on a head right list does not guarantee that the person was actually there because lists of names were frequently bought, or borrowed, from other enterprising adventurers, as m1661 Original emigrant. John sailed with a number of the young men of the district for Virginia. (O’Connor, Charles A., The Marvel Family in England, p. 296.)

 The entry for Co. Edmund Scarburgh is found in George Greer’s – “Early Virginia Immigrants 1632 to 1666.”

In the book “Early Virginia Immigrants 1632 to 1666″, is found the name of John Marvel.  Another book found in the Accomack Library the following notation reads, “May 10, 1652, Charles Scarburgh, son of Col. Edmund Scarburgh, 3050 acres in Northampton County, Virginia, transfer of 61 persons from England.” John Marvel’s name was on this list of persons brought over by Charles Scarburgh.   In the early Colonial times a man could earn much land in America by transporting people from England to America. The King of England, then King George II, wanted to get the continent settled but did not want to invest any money to do so. The payment in land, on the continent itself, for the people’s transportation was the cheapest and fastest way to do this.  John Marvel, entered land in the registry in 1652 and again in 1653.  The land registry was made in Northampton County, where the land office was located. Accomack County is next to Northampton County and was made a separate county in 1663. Remember that at this time Virginia’s boundary lines were very questionable. Virginia contained all the land that was later divided into the states of Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania, also portions of other surrounding states.

1652 May 10 John Marvell was listed as a headright in a patent to Charles Scarburgh for land on Pungoteague Creek, Northampton (later Accomack) Co. (Nugent, p. 286).

From Nugent’s “Cavaliers and Pioneers” page 286 :

CHARLES SCARBURGH, the sonn of Edmond Scarburgh, 3050 acs. Northampton Co., 10 May 1652, p. 250.  Beg. At first little branch of Pongotegue Cr. On the N. side, etc.  Trans. Of 61 pers., assigned him by his father: Rowland Evans, Edward Evans, John Jones, Margarett Tillett, William Tomlin, —– Tilley, Tho. Browne, — Carev, Jone Parrett, John Pitcher, Thomas Woodfeild, Hewes —, Mary Williams, Jonath. Showell, or (Stewoll), Marga. Pannell, Hoell Gladeing, Jenkin Luellin, Lewis Rowland, Phill. Parricoat, Cesser Yeomans, Kath. Smith, Susan Foster, John Martin, Anne Doby, Mary Edaw, (or Edan), William Skinner, Mary Edgar, Walter Wood, Alice Price, Tho. Coller, Fra. Knight, Lucretia Pott, Edward Cowen, William Hollis, Mary Bachelor, Owen Williams, Edward Sermoner, Maurice Mathews, Edward Holt, Dorothy Barnes, Tho. Up Williams,  James  Harris, Elizabeth Case, Thomas Browne, Domingo, Sarah, Paconia, Negros; John Jones, Thomas Moore, Robert King, John Renny, John Marvell, John Hordwell, Thomas Major, Wm. Adsworth, (or Oldsworth), Mary Griffeth, Thomas West, Thomas Cowen, Kath. Brumfield, Jane Davis, John Carey.”

HISTORY NOTE: Col. Edmund Scarburgh (1618-71) was a talented, aggressive, and powerful man. Held posts of high sheriff of Accomack Co. and treasurer and surveyor-general of Virginia, among others. Acquired much land, provided large tracts to his children, public-spirited, but his aggressiveness got him into trouble. He hated and abused the Indians. He incurred the wrath of Maryland by trying to claim a portion of Somerset Co. as part of Virginia. (Somerset Co. was founded and settled principally by settlers from Accomack.) Col. Scarburgh married Mary, probably Littleton; children: Charles, Edmund, Littleton, Tabitha, Matilda. 17th Century colonia Ancestors list Johns occupation as LANDOWNER. ((Notes from Juanita Ruff, ruff@cafes.net, 1997)

Another version of when John Marvell came to America is found below. As you can see it has a different date than the immigration record above. I include this information as part of the contrasting history of genealogical research.

When John Marvel immigrated to America he settled in Accomack County, Virginia. Records show he was born 4 August 1632 in Melbourne, Cambridgeshire, England. (‘shire’ in England is somewhat the same as ‘county’ in America.) In the book “Early Virginia Immigrants 1632 to 1666″ by George Greer, is found the name of John Marvel. Another book found in the Accomack Library the following notation reads, “May 10, 1652, Charles Scarburgh, son of Col. Edmund Scarburgh, 3050 acres in Northampton County, Virginia, transfer of 61 persons from England.” John Marvel’s name was on this list of persons brought over by Charles Scarburgh. In the early Colonial times a man could earn much land in America by transporting people from England to America. The King of England, then King George II, wanted to get the continent settled but did not want to invest any money to do so. The payment in land, on the continent itself, for the people’s transportation was the cheapest and fastest way to do this. John Marvel, entered land in the registry in 1652 and again in 1653. The land registry was made in Northampton County, where the land office was located. Accomack County is next to Northampton County and was made a separate county in 1663. Remember that at this time Virginia’s boundary lines were very questionable. Virginia contained all the land that was later divided into the states of Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania, also portions of other surrounding states. John, was married in 1663 to Ann West, daughter of Jonathan and Catherine West. Ann was born in 1632 but it is not known where. The records in Virginia show that Ann died in 1710. This date is questioned because in John’s will, dated 1707 he mentions his housekeeper, Matilda West (possibly a relative of Ann), but no mention of his wife Ann. The date of 1710 is likely the date Ann’s will was probated which sometimes took several years. The will of John Marvel III, was dated 3 February 1707 and recorded on 18 February 1707. It lists him as 75 years old and names only one descendant, Thomas Marvel. It also names Jonathan West, Mrs. Catherine West and Mrs. Matilda West. Catherine West was the name of his mother-in-law. It is highly unlikely that Ann’s mother would be alive at this age because Ann’s age on this date would have been 75. Records have been found stating that Mrs. Matilda West was the daughter of Col. Edmond and Mary (Scarburg) West. She was also the widow of John West, who she married in 1655. John West died in 1703. There is a strong possibility that she was Ann’s sister- in-law. She was named executrix of John Marvel III’s will. Many Quakers lived in Accomack County, Virginia as early as 1656. In later years, as their numbers increased, they were greatly persecuted. So large numbers of them fled into Maryland, at the invitation of Governor Calvert, who granted each Quaker 50 acres. Among many who fled is mentioned Matilda West, widow of John West. It is possible that John and Ann (West) Marvel had immigrated to Maryland much earlier. Somerset and Worcester Counties in Maryland are next to Accomack County in Virginia. Somerset County, Maryland was created in 1666 and divided in 1742, when Worcester County was formed. There were many boundary disputes between the two states and this part of Worcester County was given to the state of Delaware. John and Ann Marvel lived in the area of Worcester County, Maryland altho The first Marvel came from Normandy and settled in Marvelle/Marvaile, France. His name was Robert de (of) Marvelle. He served under Duke William (1028-1087), known as William the Conqueror, ruler of the independent duchy of Normandy, who defeated England at the battle of Hastings in 1066. At that time Robert de (of) Marvelle/Marvaile stood up and proclaimed himself Robert Marvel. The Marvels settled in the parishes of Melbourne, Meldreth and Shepreth in Cambridgeshire where they resided for centuries. John Marvel was born in the parish of Melbourne on May 27, 1630. He was a son of Thomas Marvel who was born in the same parish in 1594. Later descendants of Robert Marvel and John Marvel state they were known in Virginia/Maryland for their good wine and fast horses. Original immigrant. John sailed with a number of young men of the district for Virginia in 1661 (1) John Marvel appears to have been the first person of this family in America. His name was included in a list of 61 persons transferred from England to Charles Scarburg of Northampton County, Virginia, who on May 10, 1652, was granted 3.050 acres of land in that county. Early records show several different spellings of the name: Marvel, Marvil, Marvell, Maruell. John Marvel married Ann West, daughter of Jonathan and Catherine ? West, in 1663, and they had two sons, Thomas Marvel and John Marvel, Jr. On May 15, 1680′s, John Marvel, Sr., entered into an agreement whereby he gave and bequeathed his son, John Marvel, Jr., to William Jarman to be educated and employed at his discretion until he reached the age of twenty-one. In consideration therefore Jarman was to give and grant John Marvel, Jr., 100 acres of land. Later, on October 14, 1695, John Marvel, Jr., deeded to his “mother and father, lifetime. John Marvel appeared in the Accomack County tax list in 1669 and continued to appear in other lists. John Marvel, Sr., died in 1707 and the files indicate that he was seventy-five years of age which would mean that he was born in 1632. His will mentioned Thomas Marvel (apparently his son), Jonathan West, Mrs. Catherine West, and Mrs. Mathilda West, who was named executrix. Mrs. Mathilda West was the daughter of Colonel Edmond and Mary Scarburg and the widow of John West. (2)

SOURCES:1. O’Connor, Charles A., the Marvel in England, p. 296.2. Virgin, Donald Odell. “The Marvel Family: The Path to Delaware”. Received copy of this document from Bonnie Fields, December, 1995.

OTHER NOTES: Early records show several different spellings of the name: Marvel, Marvil, Marvell, Maruell.

 

Map of Middle Accomack County, Virginia  – click map for a larger view

www.esva.net/ghotes/maps/tnmid1.jpg Master Index- Middle Accomack County Map Marvell, John Jr. A109, A114 West, Matilda A64, A72, A77, A80, A109, A113 West, John A60, A62, A64, A70, A71, A72, A77, A78, A79, A80, A82, A85, A91, A109, A113 Coe, Timothy A126

www.esva.net/ghotes/maps/tnmid1.jpg
Master Index- Middle Accomack County Map
Marvell, John Jr. A109, A114
West, Matilda A64, A72, A77, A80, A109, A113
West, John A60, A62, A64, A70, A71, A72, A77, A78, A79, A80, A82, A85, A91, A109, A113
Coe, Timothy A126

 

Information for John Marvell Marvel Sr.

On May 15, 1680′s, John Marvel, Sr., entered into an agreement whereby he gave and bequeathed his son, John Marvel, Jr., to William Jarman to be educated and employed at his discretion until he reached the age of twenty-one. In consideration therefore Jarman was to give and grant John Marvel, Jr., 100 acres of land.

Later, on October 14, 1695, John Marvel, Jr., deeded to his mother and father, lifetime.

John Marvel appeared in the Accomack County tax list in 1669 and continued to appear in other lists. John Marvel, Sr., died in 1707 and the files indicate that he was seventy-five years of age which would mean that he was born in 1632. His will mentioned Thomas Marvel (apparently his son), Jonathan West, Mrs. Catherine West, and Mrs. Mathilda West, who was named executrix. Mrs. Mathilda West was the daughter of Colonel Edmond and Mary Scarburg and the widow of John West. (2)

SOURCES: 1. O’Connor, Charles A., the Marvel in England, p. 296.
2. Virgin, Donald Odell. “The Marvel Family: The Path to Delaware”. Received copy of this document from Bonnie Fields. December, 1995.

Land Transactions involving John Marvel:

1662 John Marvell on early Accomack Co., VA tax lists. (Northhampton Co. Order Boo, 1657-1664). 1663 Aug 18 Deposition of John Marvell, said tht about five or six weeks ago he was at John Waltham’s house where he saw Capt. Batts and others with him, but did not see any weapons or hostile behavior. Signed John Marvell. (Accomack Co., Virginia Court Orders, pg. 37)

1663 John Marvel married Ann West, daughter of Jonathan and Catherine ______ West and they had two sons, Thomas Marvel and John Marvel, Jr. (O’Connor, Charles A., The Marvel Family in England, p. 296.) 1663 John Marvell married Ann _____. Two dates have been offered: “1651 (John Everett Marvel, Waynesville, IL, in Virkus, “Compendium of American Genealogy”, IV, 680); and 1663 (Daisy Marvel Jones, “A Brief History of the Marvel Family”, 1960); and 1663 (J. B. Turner Collection, Delaware Archives, Marvel microfiche file). Mildred Marvel Burwell’s history relies on the Jones’ history for information on the early generations of Marvels. Jones says that Marvel married Ann West, but I have found no proof and suspect this is a guess, based on John Marvell’s will (1707-1708), see below.

J. B. Turner says that John Marvell married Ann _____ in Accomack County. Some miles north of the area settled by the Scarburghs, between Little Back Creek and French (or France) Creek, is an area of marsh, divided by narrow channels into two islands. These were early called Marvell’s Islands. And Little Back Creek was called Marvell’s Creek or My Lord Marvell’s Back Creek — a possible indication of where John Marvell eventually settled, although there is no record of his having owned land in the area himself. The islands had originally belonged to Col. Edmund Scarburgh, father of Edmund Jr. and Charles. (Whitelaw, “Virginia’s Eastern Shore, II, 1107).

1667 John listed on tax lists through 1677. 1669 John Marvel appeared in the Accomack County tax list and continued to appear in other lists. (O’Connor, Charles A., The Marvel Family in England, p. 296.)

1677 John listed for last time on tax lists of Accomack County. (Nottingham, “Accomack Tithables (Tax Lists) 1663-1695). Did John Marvill become indigent or disabled after 1677, so that he was no longer taxed?

1682 May 16 John Marvel, Sr., entered into an agreement whereby he gave and bequethed his second son John Marvel, Jr., to William Jarman to be educated and employed at his discretion until he reached the age of twenty-one. In consideration therefore Jarman was to give and grant John Marvel, Jr., 100 acres of land. The purpose of this bargain may have been to provide John Sr. a place to live.  (O’Connor, Charles A., The Marvel Family in England, p. 296.); (Accomack Co., VA Land Records, 1676-1690, p. 306-07).

1688 June 20 Will Jarman sold to John Abbot 250 acres of marshy land, between Oyster Creek and “my Lord Marvells back Creek”. (Accomack Co. Land Records, 1676-1690, p. 483.) So perhaps John Marvell, Sr. was now living on the land that Jarman had granted to John Marvell, Jr. 1694

Feb 19 John Marvell, Jr., planter, traded his 100 acres to Samuel Young in exchange for 100 acres of Samuel Young’s plantation, part of a divident of land on which Young’s father in law (stepfather) and mother were then dwelling, in the southwest corner thereof. This was on the south edge of the present town of Parksley. (Accomack Co. L.R., transcribed Part 1, 1692-1715, pp. 125-26)

1695 Sep 14 John Maruell Jr. of his own free and voluntary will granted to his mother and father, John Maruell and Ann his wife, the land whereon they then lived during their lifetime. This is the same land John Jr. had acquired from Samuel Young early in the year. (Accomack Co. L. R., transcribed Part 1, 1692-1715, p. 159-160); (O’Connor, Charles A., The Marvel Family in England, p. 296.)

1695 Dec 16 John Marvell Jr. sold to William Hutson (Hudson) the 100 acres that he had received in trade from Samuel Young. (Accomack Co. L.R., transcribed Part 1, 1695-1715, pp. 164-65)

1695 Dec 17 John Marvill Jr. came into court and acknowledged that the grant of 14 September was his real act and deed to his father and mother. (Accomack Co. L.R., transcribed Part 1, 1692-1715, p. 160)

1697 Jun 2 Samuel Young sold to William Young (his brother) the 100 acres he had received in trade from John Marvill Jr. Marvill witnessed the deed. (Accomack Co. L.R., transcribed part 1, 1692-1715, pp. 277-78)

1697 Oct 5 Another deed to William Hudson, repeating the transaction of 16 December 1695, with a couple of details added, on 5 October 1697. John Marvill, Jr. sold to William Hudson 100 acres, “being part of a divident of land whereon the said Wm. Hudson now dwelleth.” (Accomack Co. L.R., transcribed Part 1, 1695-1715, pp. 297-98) …William Hudson was evidently Samuel Young’s stepfather).

The Will of John Marvel III  (John Marvel Sr.)

The will of John Marvel III, was dated 3 February 1707 and recorded on 18 February 1707.  It lists him as 75 years old and names only one descendant, Thomas Marvel.  It also names Jonathan West, Mrs. Catherine West and Mrs. Matilda West, his housekeeper. Catherine West was the name of his mother-in-law. It is highly unlikely that Ann’s mother would be alive at this age because Ann’s age on this date would have been 75. Records have been found stating that Mrs. Matilda West was the daughter of Col. Edmond and Mary (Scarburg) West. She was also the widow of John West, who she married in 1655.  John West died in 1703. There is a strong possibility that she was Ann’s sister- in-law. She was named executrix of John Marvel III’s will.  Many Quakers lived in Accomack County, Virginia as early as 1656.  In later years, as their numbers increased, they were greatly persecuted. Large numbers of them fled into Maryland, at the invitation of Governor Calvert, who granted each Quaker 50 acres.  Among many who fled is mentioned Matilda West, widow of John West.  It is possible that John and Ann (West) Marvel had immigrated to Maryland much earlier.  Somerset and Worcester Counties in Maryland are next to Accomack County in Virginia. Somerset County, Maryland was created in 1666 and divided in 1742, when Worcester County was formed. There were many boundary disputes between the two states and this part of Worcester County was given to the state of Delaware. John and Ann Marvel lived in the area of Worcester County, Maryland.

SOURCES: 1. O’Connor, Charles A., the Marvel in England, p. 296.
2. Virgin, Donald Odell. “The Marvel Family: The Path to Delaware”.  3. Marvelcreations.com

 

General Marvel Family References- 1. Virdin, Donald Odell. “The Marvel Family: The Path to Delaware”. 815 Green Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314. 2. de Valinger, Leon, Jr. Compiled. “Calendar of Sussex County Delaware Probate Records 1680-1800″. Public Archives Commission, Dover, DE 1964.3. Records of Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church, Lewes, DE, 1755-1855.5. 1790 Delaware Census, Sussex County, Screen 9 of 85, CD137, 1st Edition. 6. 1800 DE Census of Sussex County, screen 11 of 84, CD151, 1st Edition.GCT95 = Gibson County TODAY; published Monday, Oct. 2, 1995.

Other Sources; Compendium American Genealogy; Marvel History pg 5-6; Early Virginia Immigrants; Northampton Virginia Land Registry Cox Papers; Evolution of the Name Marvel, p 10; A Brief History of the Marvel Family; The Hargadines and Other Delaware and Maryland Families.